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Staff Coaching

There are two main aspects to the role of coaching within the school. First, coaching will be used to provide the school with an alternative route for tackling whole school issues (e.g. embedding assessment for learning in teaching). Line managers will be able to guide teachers toward a coach who can help to develop that member of staff in a non-judgemental environment. In this way the role of coaching can be allied with the professional development programme already running within the school.

Second, coaching is a way of the school demonstrably giving something back to the staff. It is an investment in individuals. Coaching should act as an effective support mechanism for staff within the school. A key role of the Coaching Faculty would be to tap into the enormous skills base and potential of the staff at EBS. All staff at EBS are committed to the school and work extremely hard; coaching is a way of the school demonstrably giving something back to the staff.


Aim

Coaching is a non-judgemental conversation designed to empower the participant. The aim is to allow the coachee to take ownership of the key aspects of their work, the strengths, the blocks and any solutions.


Style

A coaching conversation focuses on the coachee. The coachee makes the decisions about the ideas that will be discussed. The role of the coach is to listen and reflect. In doing so it is hoped that the coachee will gain new insight into areas that interest them and be able to develop strategies on which they can focus.

Coaching conversations are non-judgemental.


Performance Management

Coaching meetings are highly confidential. The coachee ‘owns’ the contents of any meeting; if they wish to discuss the conversation outside the meeting they are at liberty to do so. However, the coach will never divulge what was discussed outside the confines of the coaching conversation. Any positives that are generated can, of course, feed into the performance management process and CPD (Continuous Professional Development).


Being Coached

There are several routes. A member of staff may ask their line /performance manager to approach one of the coaching team to request coaching on their behalf. A member of staff may themselves approach a member of the coaching team. A line / performance manager may suggest coaching as part of the CPD of any member of staff. Coaching often offered as support to other training programmes such as ‘Leading from the Middle’.

Coaching would benefit…

  • Staff new to the school. Coaching allows you to discuss issues and anxieties in a confidential setting, separate from any assessment process.
  • Staff new to post. Again, coaching will allow someone to discuss issues and anxieties in a confidential setting, separate from the performance management process.
  • Staff wishing to resolve develop their skills within their current role. Coaching is an excellent tool for expanding your thoughts, ideas and horizons. It allows you to investigate a range of possible solutions and select the most appropriate for yourself.
  • Staff wishing to resolve issues and blocks within their current role; see above.

Frequency

It can be one meeting, it can be many more. The average figure is approximately 4-6 meetings in a cycle of coaching.

Coaching meetings are highly confidential. The coachee ‘owns’ the contents of any meeting; if they wish to discuss the conversation outside the meeting they are at liberty to do so. However, the coach will never divulge what was discussed outside the confines of the coaching conversation. Any positives that are generated can, of course, feed into the performance management process and CPD (Continuous Professional Development).